Personal Statement: My Desire to Fulfill my Destiny as a Doctor; Why I Want to be a Doctor

In writing this, I must try my hardest to avoid the obvious and the clichéd response to my desire to become a doctor.  I am sure you have heard many of these things before, obviously, I want to saves lives and make the quality of the lives that can be prolonged and not saved, more fulfilling.  You must also hear on many occasions, many candidates saying something to the effect of  “how I have always dreamed of being a doctor.”  But, this is too simple.  Indeed, I want to save lives or, at the least, prolong them with the dignity people deserve and indeed, I have always dreamt of doing so.But, through the course of my quest to be certain, absolutely certain, of my choice, my dreams have become bigger and they stretch farther across the globe.  Now, I am content to say that this dream has become a calling and this is my call to you, through letter, to assure you that I am ready to save real lives in the real world.  I was born a doctor, an unselfish gentleman with a vision to go where the greatest need for medical care would lead. I want to be able to do medical mission work in underdeveloped countries.  I have the strength to leave everyone I know to do the only thing I know, being the man that works with his hands, his mind, and whatever medicine is available in these remote areas to change the landscape of lives, to save lives.  My recent trip to Vietnam has confirmed this.  I cannot stand by, knowing what I know now.  There are not as many doctors in place in these places where they are needed most.  I want to do better for them, I have always been inspired by that one word, “better”, and the book by that very name-Better.The most moving chapter for me in the book, Better, dealt with army doctors and their selfless help given to wounded and dying soldiers.  Their mission was clear, they were willing to risk their own lives to save others.  The held themselves to the highest standards and always kept a sense of thankfulness for all of the privileges afforded to them in the United States.  I feel that sense of duty, not just to the country that has given me opportunities, but to the world and all the people in it.  Everyone should have the opportunity to be able to seek treatment for their ills and to be treated with respect.  I have learned the value of respect from several doctors that I have shadowed.They, also, taught me about passion for the vocation, which I have, most certainly.  Love for my family has inspired me in so many ways, as well.  When two family members passed away in my undergraduate years, I felt the pain of the loss and believe, although it was a difficult transition, that this made me stronger and more able to relate to patients as people; anyone’s mother, father, sister, brother.  Every life is so much more important to me now.  I have found the same feeling through the shadowing of the greatest physicians, they care and made me learn to care even more.In closing, I would like to say that I hope you care about what I morally and whole-heartedly believe to be my destiny, to be a doctor, to travel to places that would welcome the needed assistance, and I would do this only because I care, not for notoriety or money or any selfish reasons.  I hope that you care less about some less than perfect test scores, because sometimes perfection lies in the flaws and finding them, after all, that it was medicine is about, finding any flaw and fixing it, any grades can be improved and I hope you care to see that this will be the case.  I can be better, I can reach out to people and make a better world.  Please allow me this opportunity to be better together with you and your recommendation.