The World is a Continuum

I believe that the world is one. This is similar to Siddhartha Gautama’s view that there is no ‘I’ (Clark, 2005). For me, this means that all of us are part of one. This has given me a tolerant outlook towards other people, that is, I do not discriminate others. Why do I believe this? Consider the fact that all living things share similar DNA. This means that we come from the same source, and that we are all connected by this similarity—we are branches of the same tree. Someone might argue that if we are all connected, then why can’t other people feel the pain when I prick my own finger? By being connected, I mean being connected as when the stem of a plant cut from the original plant grows into another plant. They are the same plant, but a new plant has branched out from the original. Similarly, we come from one, and every living thing around us is a branch from that one.I believe that there is a Creator, but that the creator may not be what most people conceive him to be. I say that the Creator exists because if we look around, we can see exquisite beauty in all things, and no human can create beauty of that level. We may not be able to see the Creator, but by experiencing and learning to appreciate the beauty of life, we can feel Him. How can a world with such a magnificent system of natural laws, order, and balance be a result of something other than the Creator? We can see such things in the recent discoveries of science. We can feel it when we look at the smallest divisions of life; there is order in the cells, the DNA, the atoms, and the elements.         Science and faith need not be separate! Science is merely the exploration of creation, and through the things we find, we can appreciate more the beauty of His creation.We can feel the Creator when we look at the magnitude of the universe, and realize the humbling truth of how small and insignificant we really are. We can feel Him, when we look inwards into ourselves: each of us has the power to become who we want to be; each of has unlimited potential; and most importantly, each of us is a living, breathing miracle. Life itself is beautiful, and we can feel the Creator through life!I am talking about beauty, but what about suffering? There are people who die of starvation, lack of medicine, and water contamination in many places around the world. Where is the beauty here? I say that the beauty is in the people with compassionate hearts who help these people. In such situations of severe suffering, abuse, and injustice, there we can find heroes in the form of Mother Theresa, Gandhi, and countless more people who have attempted to make this world a better place. This is beauty.I also believe that relationship with the Creator does not require us to be part of any religion, because religion can have a lot of flaws and even so called great leaders of religion can do things that they know are immoral. When they do immoral acts, such acts should not be attributed to the Creator.This world view can be used as a firm foundation in any philosophical argument I would make. Despite the fact that my world view may sound as religious and appears to be based solely on faith, in actuality, it is not. This world view is arrived through careful reasoning. We should be careful on believing in something that has no logical basis.For example, let’s consider the question “does a soul exist?” When Socrates in Plato’s Phaedo wanted to point out that the soul is immortal, I would argue that we do not even know if the soul exists in the first place, or whether or not it is in the form that we conceive it to be. Depending on the society where we grew up in, our idea of the soul is greatly imposed on us by our societal influences, whether these ideas are logical or not. This could be a source for bias.The process I used to arrive at my world view can be used in any philosophical argument. The process is simply to first examine any assertion and determine if these are fact or just assumptions, then always take a step back to reflect on whether or not my own assertions are correct. I ask myself, why could my idea be wrong? I listen to the ideas of other people, and check it against my own. Seeking to learn instead of to win an argument is also important. I continually refine my world view and seek to gain a better understanding of the world.