What is the real work of a housewife

According to Gilligan (1982), women have evolved into the self-in-relationship image, which is a trait of how women characterize themselves and their disposition in the world. Gilligan explains that women have acquired an ethic of care in their work in order to take care of the family and manage family life. The ethic of care is based on a concept of the value of respect for the needs of others and of a self due to the women’s relationships with others.The popular media started to view the role of women after the Second World War as the authority and center of moral of the family and the controller of man’s surroundings. One factor that united women as a social group is their attachment to and responsibility for home. A characteristic attribute of modernism that emerged during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was the responsibility, by nature, of women for domestic life and managing the physical and emotional needs of their families. Women were given the tasks of managing everyday life of their family (Johnson & Lloyd, 2004).Moreover, the housewife is not only seen as a social agent on the domestic work and created as an obedient and helpful partner of her husband, but an image of a mother with rights, powers and responsibilities that are created by the value of tasks based on all areas of domesticity (Donzelot, 1979).Several women kept on insisting that their primary goal and loyalty was to their home and family with job, career or public activities suited or agreeable to all the necessities and requirements of domesticity (Giles, 2004.)ReferencesDonzelot, Jacques (1979). The Policing of Families. New York: Random House.Giles, Judy (2004). Parlour and the Suburb: Domestic Identities, Class, Feminity and Modernity. Oxford, England: Berg Publishers.Gilligan, Carol (1982). In a Different Voice: Psychological Theory and Women’s Development. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Johnson, Lesley & Lloyd, Justine (2004). Sentenced to Everyday Life: Feminism and the Housewife. Oxford, England: Berg Publishers.