Where did you place the most effective arguments in your paper

I think that underscoring everything that is discussed, whatever narrow social construct that society tries to place on the object of this study, all the external pressures exerted on student athletes to perform on and off the track should be subordinated to what they need to do to succeed in whatever they would like to achieve in their careers and in their lives. Perhaps in one sense, they will be role models, if they are any good, to some small section of society. But that is where the other argument: that it shouldn’t be expected of them. Taken together, one could say that athletes face the prospect of being role models in some quarters whether they like it or not, but that should not be the overriding concern of the athlete/scholar. Perhaps there is the specter of being a role model, but it should be done on their terms.How did you address counter arguments without weakening yourown premise?Essentially, I address the various points of view by embracing them all in their appropriate context. All the points of view presented in the paper bring some valid points to the table, but one does not by any means want to apply them as the immutable truth. Society and culture the people that function within these organic constructs are complicated, so I think it would be extremely limiting to be partisan and embrace one side and discount the applicability of the other arguments in some way. While the person presenting a given point of view might have intended to apply their argument more broadly, that does not stop a writer who is capable of thinking critically and in a circumspect way from giving them a more limited application, or applying them in a completely different way than was intended altogether.