World View on Family Relationships

A world view is “an orientation to philosophical inquiry that focuses upon the creative capacities of the human being and how the human being can shape and/or respond to the material facts, limitations, rules, predictabilities, and essences to be found in human life.” (Lantz, 165-166) World views are often incorporated into specific social interactions and relationships. This essay focuses on world views regarding relationships with parents and relationships with parents.The world view of an individual’s relationship with his/her mother is one that exemplifies unconditional giving. This is based on world views of existentialism on the mechanism of social exchange. (Lantz, 2004) A mother is viewed to be someone who is capable of caring for, nurturing, and aiding her child via all the possible means available.The relationship with the father, on the other hand, is seen as someone who also gives unconditionally albeit a more stiff and distanced exterior. The father is the disciplinarian in the family unit. However, he is also seen as the one who provides the resources also unconditionally. In today’s society, the mother has also taken the role of the breadwinner but the view that she is still the one who answers other nurturing needs still hasn’t changed.An individual’s relationship with his or her siblings, based on the world view of existence, is one of participatory subjectivity. (Lantz, 2004) There are different levels of connection but nevertheless basic elements remain constant. These include empathy, emotional availability and human connection. (Lantz, 2004) In fact, all members of the family are viewed to exhibit these characteristics. A family, over all, is viewed to have a relationship that is proactive and geared towards the improvement of its members. It is viewed to be a support system that fosters growth. These views contribute to the creation of a more adaptive environment in families and allows for the creation of better members of society.ReferenceLantz, Jim. “World view concepts in existential family therapy.” Contemporary Family Therapy, 26(2004): 165-178.