World War I

Sir Edward Grey’s famous remark given in the 4th of August 1914 about the lamps going out all over Europe seem to imply that civilization back then is gradually crumbling with immorality, profligacy, and upheaval rampant in the society. Sir Grey’s statement appears to be a pessimistic notice for the whole of Europe but not really for the people back then. During his time, before the First World War, people widely believed that war and total destruction will result to the betterment of social and political conditions. Amidst darkness surrounding them and depending on the conditions back then, people see light in wars (TIME U.S.).The First World War lasted for four years and has brought transfiguration to European life politically, economically, and socially. After the war, there was much financial losses and human casualties. European countries began to crumble.Government types shifted in countries like Germany, France and Britain. People became involved to various movements pleading for the betterment of their lives. The war brought advantages to technology; to the production of physical and chemical means of warfare. In addition to this, numerous European countries attempt to pay their allies for debts and losses have resulted to inflation. Those who were involved in the manufacture of these machineries and equipments benefitted from the war while those unskilled workers receiving fixed low wages while prices doubled were devastated. There were also changes in the working class as women began to be part and be recognized in the society they are in.Four years of destruction and turmoil had brought great suffering and minor gain to most people during that time which is in contrast to what was initially expected from the war.Remarks of Sir Edward Grey seemed to have been manifested after the First World War.References:TIME U.S. (May 1, 1939). Europe: 1,063 Weeks.   Retrieved April 30, 2009, from http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,761150-8,00.htmlDuffy, M., ed. (August 11, 2001). Who’s Who: Sir Edward Grey.   Retrieved April 30, 2009, from http://www.firstworldwar.com/bio/grey.htm